I’m mad, but so is BT

My blog on dealing with a typical British industry, BT (British Telecom), their surreal behaviour, and incompetence, and its toll on my mental health.

I’m going to take time out from writing about writing and madness to describe my difficulties with BT (British Telecom, the main telecommunications company in the UK – they provide the lines, but other companies can also provide the calls, which is altogether a rather bizarre situation). It is relevant to my blog though because it’s been such a distraction to me, and has taken up a large amount of time I could have spent much better doing worthier things. The problems have become something of an obsession – I find myself thinking about it a lot of the time, which is never a good sign for someone with mental health problems. At several points I have felt like giving up, but then thought damn it, if not me, whom? I suspect my difficulties in dealing with a big company are not unusual, but most don’t have the time or energy to pursue the culprits.

I think BT is fairly typical of British (perhaps most western) companies (and the public sector, including education) today: it’s too big, it outsources too much, it uses overseas call centres, and generally making it difficult for the individual customer to get anywhere with it. Its online system seems designed to sell, and not much else. The big managers, who make the big money, insulate themselves as much as possible from the customers, or “clients”. They probably have no idea what’s going on, and probably don’t want to.

It all started innocently enough just under year ago when BT phoned me, right out of the blue. Now I will swallow my pride here, and admit that it all serves me right for breaking my vow of never answering the phone to an unknown number, let alone never making a decision during a phone call. But the chap was very persuasive and informative: did I know that BT fibre optic “Infinity” broadband (very fast broadband, up to 80 mbps), was available in my area? I didn’t, and I was pleasantly surprised, because I live in a Scottish village pretty much in the middle of nowhere, so I had been expecting to get super fast broadband sometime around 2269. Furthermore, said this helpful and cheery chap, BT had an offer on, where they would give me BT TV on a special introductory offer for something like £10 a month for the first year. It would save me altogether £30 a month or so compared with what I was paying Sky just then. I was a bit incredulous: you mean I could get Sky Sports and Sky Cinema too? And all my other usual channels? I quite like Sky. They have a good range of channels and everything just works (most of the time). Yes, he said, you will have everything you have now, but it will be £30 a month cheaper. AND you will get UHD (4k) TV? Really? YES! Wow. What about Sky? He said BT would deal with Sky and sort out everything – I wouldn’t have to do anything. So I agreed. Emails detailing the contract were promised and an appointment with the engineer arranged for the near future. And BT would sort out EVERYTHING!

The engineer arrived the next week and set up the fast broadband with a new router and BT TV. Oh no he said, BT won’t sort out Sky TV; who told you that? You’ll have to speak to them yourself. BT would only take over Sky Broadband. But I had never had Sky Broadband – I’d always been with BT! Funny BT didn’t know I was their own customer. PIECE OF BT RUBBISH No. 1. I told the engineer I had never received the email contract, and he said he would have to send it again. PIECE OF BT RUBBISH No. 2.

Eventually he got my admittedly rather sophisticated television working with the set-up. Everything seemed to work and off he went. I started to explore the channels. It turns out there’s hardly anything to watch in UHD. But more importantly, where were Sky Movies and Sky Sports? I only had Freeview channels. Oh you have to order those separately said BT. I THOUGHT I ALREADY HAD. PIECE OF BT RUBBISH No. 3. But to be fair the price was as stated. But what was this, BBC News channel in standard definition? Where is the high definition version? It turns out that Sky beams everything down to you from their little satellite, while BT just sends the special stuff down the line, and picks up the Freeview channel from the air (confused yet?), and in my area I couldn’t get BBC News in HD. No one had explained that to me before. PIECE OF BT RUBBISH No. 4.  Talking of explanations, where was my promised contract? Needless to say, it never arrived. PIECE OF BT RUBBISH No. 5. But the good news was that I now had Sky Sports and Cinema. Or rather, I had Sky Sports 1 and 2, not all the Sky Sports channels, including Sky Sports News. Turns out these aren’t included, and the cinema package was similarly crippled. PIECE OF BT RUBBISH No. 6. And even worse, the channels I did get were only in standard definition, which is nearly as bad as watching black and white. It turns out that BT don’t provide them in HD. PIECE OF BT RUBBISH No. 7. So much for providing every thing I had before with Sky; I consider this PIECES OF BT RUBBISH No. 6 and 7 together to constitute mis-selling. I am tempted to use stronger words. If I had been told this at the start I would have put the phone down after ten seconds. So it was a good job BT hadn’t closed down my Sky contract after all, and that I had kept my Sky Box connected. But instead of having a perfectly satisfactory Sky contract, I now had a perfectly satisfactory Sky contract,  fast internet, and a perfectly unsatisfactory BT contract, and I instead of saving £30 with faster broadband, I am paying £50 more than I thought I would be.

And don’t get me going on the television box. I never did get the knack of the forward and rewind, but this might have been my clumsiness. It did keep on crashing though, which wasn’t me. It’s the software, not the hardware, and it will probably improve with time. I still consider the functionality to be PIECE OF BT RUBBISH No. 8.

Months passed. I seethed inwardly. I thought about complaining but as my regular readers will know, I was very ill, and had enough on my plate, as my gran would have said. After all, in the great scheme of things I haven’t been left without emergency cover, and I did have fast broadband. And TV. Two TV systems in fact, one though I never used.

But as the bills mounted up I seethed more and more, and then one day, I got a Sky Q box. And it worked just fine. Tidying up the wiring I decided I had had enough, so I packed up the BT TV box. This is crazy, I thought, so I went to the BT site to work out how to make the point that I thought service hadn’t been that great. I also wanted to find out when the BT television contract ended. The only thing I could find on their site was phoning someone up, or an online complaints system. So I filled in the complaint form.

At this point, if they had just said we’re very sorry, there seems to be some misunderstanding, and we’ll let you off your television contract a month early, I’d have been ecstatic. But they didn’t. They didn’t even understand what I was talking about.  PIECE OF BT RUBBISH No. 9.

From now on things become increasingly surreal. One has to be careful here because it turns out that the BT complaints system is nothing more than a glorified out-sourced call centre, and some people think you can’t criticise call centres based in other countries without being a racist. I have no great objection to call centres as long as they work, but the problem is that usually they don’t. I find I often have difficulty understanding what the person is saying, and they certainly don’t seem to understand me. (I don’t think that’s a racist thing to say, but these days, who knows.) I do feel slightly aggrieved that British Telecom outsources these jobs to non-British people, but that’s globalisation for you. I also feel sorry for the workers in these places: presumably they are poorly paid, crammed into a room, and spend hour after hour having to deal with irate people. No, it’s the senior managers who deserve our wrath.

I remember reading an article in the press by a BT manager saying that their Indian call centre was wonderful but some of their customers were disgustingly rude. There is no excuse for rudeness but I can see why people get so upset. I bet the head of BT doesn’t try to resolve their problems by going through their call centre. I don’t think it’s a sensible way to run a complaints system – and certainly it shouldn’t be the only way. PIECE OF BT RUBBISH No. 10.

So the first response was an email back saying that they were very sorry my equipment wasn’t working, and did I want an engineer to come out?

What? I replied saying that wasn’t the real problem. I hadn’t made myself clear. I repeated about the mis-selling.

They replied saying they’d been trying to phone me …

I replied saying my hearing isn’t that good (particularly with foreign accents on the phone, and in any case I prefer things in writing, so could they please not phone me). I repeated again that the main problem was one of mis-selling, and also cancelling my television contract. They’d told me when it ended, but I could get no one to confirm in writing that they had cancelled it from that date as I had asked. The person said they’d need to transfer me to a different department. What, I thought complaints dealt with things when nothing else worked? PIECE OF BT RUBBISH No. 11. The other department would email me.

Oh no they didn’t. PIECE OF BT RUBBISH No. 12. A few days later the phone started ringing. Guess who it was? So now I add to my list of issues that they phoned when I asked them not to phone. Guess how they tried to respond to this? You’ve got it. Let’s add poor customer service to the list. PIECE OF BT RUBBISH No. 13.

So someone was meant to write back. And they never did. PIECE OF BT RUBBISH No. 14.

I left it a while and then complained that they had never answered, through their strange complaints system again. The response was as you never CALLED back. What? PIECE OF BT RUBBISH No. 15. This person gave a lengthy apology in a very tiny font saying that BT values their customers and that people had been spoken to. Don’t they realise how annoying being told this can be when they hadn’t yet done a thing to help? This person said they had revised my complaint and identified that I had issues with BT TV. Yes but not technical issues; they didn’t address at all the point that it did nothing that I had been told it would be, and that it was working out to be more expensive, not less. And you can’t get Sky Movies and Sport HD, I reminded her. Yes you can! she (I think) replied. NO YOU CAN’T I said. Oh no, not in HD, she eventually conceded. And still no one had confirmed that they had cancelled my television contract! PIECE OF BT RUBBISH No. 15 (and I’m almost tempted to make this double rubbish given they deny themselves).

So I decided to try what seems to be the only thing that works these days: tweeting in the public arena. Again, I feel sorry for the poor individuals who are paid to reply to my rants. But at least they respond!

So then I get a bizarre email saying they are sending out an engineer. I never asked for an engineer! How on earth is an engineer going to sort out mis-selling? Their complaints department seem incapable of understanding what the problem is (another issue I have with overseas call centres). I feel sorry for this engineer. There is no easy way I can see on the email of telling them I can’t be in that time (other than phoning). PIECE OF BT RUBBISH No. 16.

I email again, and guess how they respond – yes, you’ve got it, by phoning me again. PIECE OF BT RUBBISH No. 17. I admit I get a bit irate at this point. I keep on saying that now I just want the email address of someone to talk to who understands English, but that is clearly too much to ask for with BT. The one easy thing they could they never attempt to do. By this point my blood pressure is soaring, I have dozens of emails not addressing any of my substantive points, the phone is ringing, the Twitter people seem perplexed, I am still paying £50 more than I used to, an engineer is coming out to sort out a non-existent technical problem, and the managers are still drawing their obscene salaries. And I’ve started obsessing about all this so it is really getting to me and not doing my recovery any good at all.

UPDATE: I think I’m getting somewhere with my Twitter campaign. They want me to send them my telephone number. And then a couple of hours later, I get a message back saying … they’re sending an engineer out tomorrow! I wonder about the ability of their complaints staff to read simple English. Or perhaps I don’t write simple English. Or perhaps now they’re just having a laugh. PIECE OF BT RUBBISH No. 18. I despair. I just want somebody sensible to talk to.

The engineer phones to confirm his appointment the evening before. An excellent idea, I explain the situation to him, and tell him not to come. He is very good. BT GOLD STAR!

If anyone can reduce the above to under 140 characters, please let me know. And if any of them are reading this and feel bad enough about themselves to do anything about it, here is a reminder that my email address is trevor.harley@mac.com.

FINAL UPDATE: I emailed the CEO, and his complaints department sorted it out the next day. BT GOLD STAR! But it shouldn’t have been so difficult. I just wanted someone to talk to. After a while the complain took on a life of its own because no one could be bothered to listen properly.

Author: trevorharley

I am Emeritus Professor of Psychology at the University of Dundee, Scotland. I am the author of several books, including the best selling texts "The psychology of language" (now in its fourth edition) and "Talking the talk: Language, psychology and science". I am currently also writing books on the science of consciousness and on the philosophy of science as applied to psychology (the latter with Richard Wilton), with both due to be published in 2017. Several other books are in the pipeline. My research interests are varied and I have published widely in some of the leading peer-reviewed psychology journals. My interests include language production, how we represent meaning, computer models of the mind, sleep and dreams, consciousness, mental illness, personality and motivation, the effects of brain damage on behaviour, and how the weather influences behaviour. I believe passionately that scientists, particularly those paid from the public purse, have a duty to explain what they do to that public. I also believe that we can reach a wide audience by the use of social media and new ways of explaining what we do. In my spare time I use stand-up comedy to talk about my research; a few years ago I appeared at the Edinburgh Fringe. One of the strangest things about being a comic is that I am often severely depressed (as well as anxious and obsessive). I have been on many types of medication, with varying degrees of success. When depressed I am always struck by how pointless everything seems: nothing seems worthwhile, and those things that I usually enjoy (playing the piano - even if not very well, looking at the natural world, reading, watching movies) no longer entice. My interest in things is a very accurate barometer of how well I am. I have realised that some mental illnesses, particularly severe mood disorders, are in part a loss of purpose and meaning in life. Becoming well involves recovering this purpose. I am also very keen to help remove the stigma that still surrounds mental illness. All of my life I have been puzzled by the question of what is the best way to spend my time. This blog is my search for answer to that question. In it I talk about my life, psychology, mental illness, purpose, living a better life, time management, existential despair, death (making me a death blogger I suppose), being creative, writing, and trying to write when depressed. I try and blog once a week or so; long silences usually mean I'm too depressed to write. For more information about me, see the home page of my website at www.trevorharley.com. I welcome comments on my blog, or if you prefer you can email me at trevor.harley@mac.com. You can follow me on Twitter at @trevharley.

2 thoughts on “I’m mad, but so is BT”

    1. For now, for now. Without wishing to sound too dramatic, the point is that this situation is indicative of what is wrong with British society, and why, apparently, so many “ordinary” people are angry. They (we) feel ignored while a select few get to be very rich and powerful – unaccountably so, to us. BT must know they have an awful reputation for customer service – don’t take my word for it, but look instead at the national press. Last month the Telegraph ran a lengthy series of letters about it, for example. They must know that part of the problem is because they’ve got rid of British jobs and replaced them with cheap outsourced jobs. They must know all this, but evidently don’t care; all they care about is generating as large a profit for possible, and rewarding the leading executives with obscene levels of “pay”.

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